When you're ready to buy bedroom furniture, start out with a floor plan and a measured drawing of the space. Furniture should fit the room it lives and this is particularly true for bedroom furniture. Don't choose a heavy, large bed and dresser for a small bedroom. If the ceiling is high, a tall headboard will help to visibly bring it down to size.

In newer construction, drywall is normally hollow and supported by vertical 2x 4 wood beams (studs) that are 16” apart. If your bed is set up on a non-exterior wall, use a stud finder to mark where your bed’s wood wall beams are and cut out an alcove. Your new alcove may not be incredibly deep, but it may be all you need for small necessities like an alarm clock or some personal items.
A bedroom in a sunny Brooklyn, New York apartment featured on Homepolish gets a soft rustic vibe courtesy of flea market finds. Storied pieces like the painted wood headboard and old pastoral painting add charming appeal. Mismatched end tables are a homey touch that builds one of a kind character. An assortment of embellishments like the books and short sprigs of lavender create a lived-in look that does not feel cluttered. 

Instead of bold primary colors, choose soothing shades and a restful palette of monochromatic tones. Remember color theory: gentle hues of blue, lavender, or green are considered calm and serene. Rich jewel-toned hues help set the mood of coziness and comfort. These might include toasty browns, deep pomegranate, or topaz. Use toned-down versions of your favorite colors in the bedroom." That might mean choosing mauve instead of eggplant, or pumpkin instead of tangerine.
To be completely honest, I was a sceptic about the whole “curtains are necessary” thing. In our last bedroom, we had cellular shades, and I never ended up hanging curtains. I didn’t get what the big deal was. In this bedroom, we do plan on adding cellular shades as well, but now I know that curtains do SO much more for a space rather than just blocking light or adding privacy.

Sharrah is a DIY home decor and style expert. Taking after her mother, interior designer extraordinaire Rebecca Robeson from Robeson Design, Sharrah creates new videos every week on ways to improve your bedroom, bathroom, living room, or studio space on a budget! As a fashion blogger and as the daughter of an interior designer, Sharrah is passionate about creating beauty and style in daily outfits and in all environments. After just getting married in 2016, Sharrah and her husband Tyler and their adorable puppy labradoodle Scout are kicking off the year with fun, fresh videos about their new life in their SMALL apartment in LA!
In this bedroom designed by Hecker Guthrie, there are so many fun texture moments happening. It inspires us to embrace architectural quirks and existing bones rather than trying to hide them. If you don't have exposed brick or stone walls, look for furniture and decor items that feature natural materials. Then warm things up with layers of cozy linens.
Out of every space in a home, your bedroom is without a doubt the most personal. Even though it's an area many of your guests may never actually see, it still deserves a great deal of attention. It's where you recharge, reflect on the day, and even spend time reading a book, so it only makes sense for it to feature the right color palette and furnishings. And let’s not forget that it also has to showcase your design style accurately and complement the overall aesthetic that’s reflected in other areas of your home.
Although the words "contemporary" and "modern" are often used interchangeably, they are not the same. Modern refers to a specific decorating style that first arose in the 1920s and became extremely popular as it modified into mid-century modern during the 1950s and 1960s. Contemporary refers to the popular decorating styles at any given time. As mid-century modern is currently very contemporary, the words have become synonymous.
It doesn't have to be an entire étagère-full, but a cluster of pieces that make you smile will go a long way in making a bedroom feel just right, as with this bedroom in a Greenwich Village penthouse, featuring antique French linens, a 19th-century Indian lantern, and plenty of paintings collected over the years. Bonus: This is also a great way to incorporate pieces you've acquired over time but can't quite figure out where to put them.
In newer construction, drywall is normally hollow and supported by vertical 2x 4 wood beams (studs) that are 16” apart. If your bed is set up on a non-exterior wall, use a stud finder to mark where your bed’s wood wall beams are and cut out an alcove. Your new alcove may not be incredibly deep, but it may be all you need for small necessities like an alarm clock or some personal items.
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